Just a book reminder

Hello everyone!  Just wanted to remind you all that I’ve been doing a lot of reading this year and I’ve reviewed quite a few of the books that I have finished right here on the blog!  Just click the header up near the top of the page that says “Books 2016”.  I finished another one today, so I’ll post my latest review here as well as above just for the fun of it.  According to Goodreads, I’ve read 29 books so far this year!!  Woo-Hoo! I’m pretty happy about that, and needless to say, there’ll be more to come.  I have not reviewed every single book above on my Books 2016 tab, but a majority are on there.  I hope you’ll find one or two that may pique your interest🙂

painted-house

September 9    A Painted House  by John Grisham            I went into “retro” mode with this book as I listened to it on audio cassette  over the period of a few weeks. I enjoyed it a lot and think it’s probably worth 4 stars – but I think I’d actually give it 4.5 stars, with the extra half-star simply for the awesome narrator in this audio book! I like John Grisham but have not read any of his work for a very long time. This one was published a long time ago (2001) and didn’t contain one word about lawyers – which may have been one reason why I was attracted to it. The story takes place in about 1952 in rural Arkansas, on a cotton farm. Life on a farm back then was pretty rough, and this novel does not sugarcoat it. I truly enjoyed listening to this book and the narrator did a fine, fine job depicting the southern accents, as well as different verbalization for each character. A lot happens in this rural community during the course of one cotton picking season… lots of things that little Luke (our 7 year old main character) hears and witnesses. It’s a good story, but I think I enjoyed it even more because it was an audio edition.

An Autumnal Getaway

cruise-shipBack in 2013, hubby and I took a very exciting trip to Europe and did a Mediterranean cruise.  We got to see lots of all new places and totally enjoyed it — well, until I got a really nasty nasty cold, two days before the end of the 10 day cruise….. but I digress.  We love cruising. I could write an entire blog post on Why We Love Cruising but instead of that, I’ll give a couple of the biggest reasons. Number One:  You get to see lots of different places and only have to unpack once.  Number Two:  Somebody else does the “driving” & your food, “hotel”, and some entertainment are all included in the price.   There are pages I could write on choosing the right cruise line for you, the cruise destination, the type of cabin, and how to get a good price on the cabin you choose – but instead I’m just going to talk about the cruise we chose.

We’ve decided to do an Autumn Canada – New England cruise this year.  It’s been three years for us and honestly, I’ve been champing at the bit to go again.  Last year we nearly booked a similar trip, but just could not justify the price we were going to have to pay, so we canceled it. This year, we found a slightly shorter cruise, 10 nights instead of 14, on a different cruise line, and a different class of cabin – one that was more affordable, AND, since we no longer had a sick kitty that needed twice-daily medication  :-(   well, we decided to go for it.  Some people when choosing a cruise, look at the ship and it’s amenities first. We don’t. We look at the itinerary first because we really enjoy exploring NEW places, and the ship itself doesn’t really matter to us (the cruise line does matter, but the particular ship, no).  In fact, this time we selected an “Inside” cabin to save some more money.  We have friends who have told us that having an Inside cabin (no porthole) is perfectly fine and comfortable – and after all you’re really only in your cabin to sleep, anyway.  In the past, I’ve loved having a Balcony Cabin, but we’re going to try an Inside this time. 

In 2009 we went on a similar cruise to Canada and New England, but this time we picked all new ports, except for one repeat, Halifax Nova Scotia.  We’ll get to Maine, Prince Edward Island, Massachusetts, Quebec City, & Newport Rhode Island. This will be our 7th cruise. Sometimes we’ve traveled with friends, sometimes on our own… this time it will be just the two of us.

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I’m so excited to go on our little “Autumnal Getaway” this year!  I’m sure I’ll post some pics to Facebook along the way, and will definitely report back here with the full recap.  The pictures above show…. a lighthouse in Maine, the hotel Chateau Frontenac in Quebec City, a pastoral scene on Prince Edward Island, and the waterfront mansions of Newport Rhode Island. 

A Tribute to Jinx, our cat

Two weeks ago we said goodbye to our precious kitty, Jinx.  It’s hard to put into words what a sad day that was for us. Jinx was our only pet and he adopted us back in July of 2005.  He started hanging around our house and lounging on our back deck for days on end that summer, till hubby finally agreed he could stay. We took him to the vet, checked to see if he’d been microchipped (he had not), and claimed him as ours. Much later on we would find out that Jinx’s first owner was a person who lived up the street. He’d come from a multi-cat home and apparently wanted to be the only feline, not part of a pack, so he found us. I was secretly thrilled to have a kitty again. All my life I’ve had cats, so at least for me he was a very welcome addition.  Here’s one of the first photos we ever took of Jinx:

July 2005

The vet estimated his age to be about 2 years when we got him. He was young, spry, and more than a little wild at times.   Hubby was somewhat reluctant to let him in the house (claiming he was allergic), but it didn’t take long before Jinx knew just which family member he needed to win over.

Aug 2005

In absolutely no time at all, “Daddy” became Jinx’s favorite human, and stayed that way all his life.  Yes, “Mommy” was okay, but Daddy was special to Jinx and pretty soon Jinx became special to Daddy as well.

Jinx loved to go hunting all his life. He had a lot of fun stalking birds, mice, and even an occasional squirrel. I think the word has gone around the birds in our neighborhood – “the threat is gone”.

Oct 2005

We live in a forest, and while we have neighbors on either side, there are nothing but trees across the street. Jinx had a very fun life as both an outside and an inside kitty.  Here he is, wandering through the woods near our house:

Jinx 02

 

On cold, wet days Jinx loved to “hug” the heat dish. We often expected his fur to singe, but it never happened.

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He grew into a big, pretty boy.  At his heaviest we weighed around 12 pounds. Here he is, having a drink of water on the bathroom counter – forget the bowl of water next to his food, nope, he preferred drinking out of his cup.

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A few years passed and Mommy & Daddy decided to buy a motor home.  It only took a couple trips for Jinx to morph into “Jinx the RV Cat”.  He adapted beautifully to RV life and wearing a harness/leash to go exploring outside:

Jinx40

We took a three month long RV trip in the winter of 2014, going from Washington state to California, across the southern USA to Florida and all the way back.  The next photo shows Jinx and Daddy looking intently into the distance…

Jinx42

We were in Florida, and they had spied an armadillo!!  Jinx desperately wanted to go investigate, but needless to say, that was not allowed.

Jinx was such an easily adaptable kitty!  When Mom and Dad bought a vacation place in Palm Springs, of course Jinx came along for several months a year.  This place was not “home” though, so Jinx didn’t get the run of the neighborhood. He enjoyed checking out his environment from high places and loved to walk the walls:

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The water of the pool didn’t scare Jinx. No, he never went swimming, but he constantly wanted to drink out of the pool which we couldn’t allow because it’s saltwater. Here’s a pic of Jinx and Mommy (his 2nd favorite human):

Jinx36

 

When Jinx was about 10, he began to lose weight. It was very gradual, and for a long time we thought he was stressed over a stray male cat in the neighborhood.  But the weight loss continued even after the stray male was long gone.  His appetite really dropped off and he became an incredibly picky eater. He also did a fair amount of regurgitating, which, contrary to popular belief is not normal for cats.  You can see by this next photo that he had definitely lost some weight:  (still cute and engaging as ever, though!!🙂

Jinx45

 

When he lay down, all his bones poked through.  It was so sad and so hard to see him literally wasting away.

Jinx54

 

Jinx was diagnosed with presumed Inflammatory Bowel Disease in March of this year (2016). I say  presumed because there is no definitive test to rule it in or out.  He may also have had his IBD transform into bowel Lymphoma, which is common.  There are many, many cats – and dogs also – who suffer with and eventually die from this debilitating disease.  Unfortunately, veterinarians are not certain what causes this to happen, but it’s much like an auto-immune disease. There are plenty of theories out there…. too many carbohydrates in pet food from corn and wheat….. wheat gluten in the gravy of pet foods….. some of the “gums” like carrageenan gum in pet foods….. an allergy to a certain protein such as beef, chicken, or fish.  The vet prescribed a special pet food that Jinx flatly refused to eat after a few bites. He was also on steroids, probiotics, and antibiotics at times.  On his last vet visit, he was down to 5.5 pounds – such a huge difference from his once robust 12 pounds.

I know that Jinx had a very happy life – here in Washington where he could explore the great outdoors at will, in California where he enjoyed basking in the sun, and on the RV trips where he’d go out on his leash every day.  He loved cuddling with his Dad and sitting next to Mom on the top of the couch. He loved visiting all the neighbors (and their indoor kitties) on a regular basis, and was known and loved by all.  It will be quite a while before we can think of our special boy and not be sad…. and someday, I hope we’ll be able to open our hearts to another kitty who will love us back with everything they’ve got – just like Jinx did. We miss you, precious boy.

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Jinx the Cat  2003-2016  RIP

 

 

 

 

 

 

My favorite YouTube Channels

About three years ago I discovered YouTube. I used to think it was just a site where a person could upload videos to keep, but quickly I learned that if you want to find out how to do something, there’s a video for that on YouTube!  One that immediately comes to mind is when hubby wanted to get one of our desk top computers going. The video suggested that you blow a hot hair dryer on the back of the CPU and it should fire up in about 5 minutes. It sounded crazy, but hey, it worked!  I discovered YouTube when I wanted to find a new way to style my hair (back when I was growing it out).  So I guess my first real discovery was–

33kateThe Small Things Blog    Kate lives in North Carolina and used to be a hairdresser, but now is a stay-at-home mom to two young boys. Her earlier videos are great for finding new and fun ideas for hair that is shoulder length of longer.

Please click on the name of each channel to view one of my favorite videos.     Here are some more of my favorites:

22freyThe Frey Life    Mary and Peter are a young (20-something) couple living in New England. Mary has Cystic Fibrosis and their daily videos document what day to day life is like, dealing with a serious chronic illness. Love these guys and their service dog “Ollie”, a standard poodle.

44emilyEmilyNoel83   If you enjoy makeup, product reviews, and tutorials, this is IMHO the best beauty channel out there. Emily gives great advice and honest reviews. She used to be in TV news, but is now a stay-at-home mom to an almost 2 year old and has another baby on the way.

55lindThe Lindquists    This is a young Canadian family, living in Ontario. Elle is a stay-at-home mom to two little boys and her husband Dan is a veterinarian. The video I linked is the vlog of the birth of their now 2 month old baby, Cohen. I was so impressed with Elle’s determination to go natural, with a midwife. Amazing video.  Oh, just so you know, there is nothing “gross” on the video. Edited beautifully.

wynnsGone With the Wynns    Niki and Jason Wynn used to be full time RVers.  About 4 months ago, they bought a catamaran sailboat and live on it full time with their two cats, while learning to sail and navigate.  I loved watching their RV videos (they did an extended RV trip to Alaska last summer that was super interesting), and wondered if I could “get into” their new sailboat life. Yup. I’m in.

11jeremy

Jeremy Ng    This talented young man plays the most beautiful piano music – totally relaxing and what a pleasure to not only listen to the music, but to be able to actually watch him play.  Love it!

nomadicNomadic Fanatic    Eric and his cat Jax live in a Class “C” motorhome and travel all over the USA. Eric is from Washington State (like me!) and is currently heading east towards Maine. His videos are extremely well edited and I love the views from his quadcopter/drone!

nikkiAt Home With Nikki    If you want a beautiful, organized, and clean home, just watch Nikki for inspiration. I love her style!

11dominiqueDominique Sachse     Dominique is a news anchor in Houston and has a great YouTube channel too. She does hair tutorials, as well as beauty and fashion tips. She’s so pleasant and professional, I can’t help but like her.

adamwooThe Daily Woo    Have you ever heard of “Adam the Woo”?  Well I hadn’t either, until recently. He’s a 41 year old guy who travels around in his van and explores the world around him with his video camera and his drone. He’s different and he’s fun.

leslieLipgloss Leslie    Leslie lives with her hubby and kitty in Dallas. She loves makeup and is just the sweetest thing ever. Sometimes she chooses colors that are pretty edgy, but she always stays her sweet self. She offers fun reviews of both drugstore and high end makeup and skincare products, plus informative “Get Ready With Me” videos, too.

So, there you have it, a list of my favorite YouTubers. It’s kind of an eclectic group, and I hope you’ll enjoy checking some of them out🙂

Mid-year update on New Year Resolutions

We’ve made it through half of 2016 already! Amazing how fast time flies by.  I made three “resolutions” this year and here’s how I’m doing so far:

Numero Uno: Decluttering my home.  Guys, I have done amazing on this!  We have donated many, many big bags of generalized stuff to charity.  I started in my kitchen and literally went through every single cupboard, cabinet, and drawer.  I’ve cleared out doubles of things I didn’t need, and oodles of items that I never used. My kitchen is now SO much better organized – and that makes me really happy. I went through the pantry from top to bottom and yes, I regretfully say I had to toss some items out.  With things better organized, I now know exactly what I have and where it is, so hopefully my days of throwing stuff out is over.  Then I moved on to the bedroom, going through my bedside table, dressers, and the closet. I parted with SO MUCH stuff that is no longer loved or useful. I cleaned out and organized under the bathroom sinks and all the cupboards and drawers in both the bathrooms.  I was UNABLE to clear out stuff belonging to my husband…. well, I could have, but that would be putting the marriage in jeopardy (I wanted to, SO badly, I’ll admit).  Hubby’s mantra continues to be: “I need everything I have”.  Obviously I strongly disagree, but… what can I do?  So, this leaves the third bedroom/office.  I am presently in the throes of working on this massive project and hope to have it in great order by the end of August.

Numero dos: Eat healthier foods.  Mixed results on this one.  I had hoped to be making my own fermentations by now, but I haven’t done it.  I AM still making my own milk kefir and not only is it delicious, it’s also full of wonderful probiotics.  When we spent two months at the Palm Springs place, I feel as though we didn’t do very well on general healthy eating.  We seem to go out to eat more down there and attend more social events.  Poor excuse, I know.  I do love this time of year when we’re getting oodles of wonderful fresh veggies which I include in our menu daily🙂 Bottom line: I need to do better.

Numero Tres:  Compute less and read more.   Up until the past two weeks, I have done great at this I’m happy to report!  I have already read more books this year, that in all of last year (25 so far!).  Then, two weeks ago I discovered an addictive TV show (which I’m watching on the computer) called “The Great British Bake Off”.  I can’t stop watching!!  I’m on season 3 of 5 so far.  I will admit that not only is it entertaining, I honestly have learned some interesting things watching it as well.  I mean – who knew what “choux” pastry is (pronounced “shoe”)?  I didn’t, but now I do!!!  And a myriad of other interesting things too.  Hey, it’s almost like reading a “how to bake” book!  At least it’s educational.🙂   On the book scene, I am presently in the process of reading 4 books, and loving them all.  It’s a little nutty to have four books going at once, but I guess it’s how I roll – at times. Last week I got to page 120 of a library book, thinking up to that point that it was pretty good, and then it went downhill FAST.  Some folks force themselves to finish every book they start, but not me.  That one went back to the library, pronto!  Too many good books, too little time!

So, there’s the mid-year update on my resolutions.  There is definitely still work that needs to be done and I will forge ahead!!

My Life as a Neonatal Nurse Part One

nursery1

Three years ago, I retired from my life-long career of nursing. I spent around 35 years working in various hospitals and always with infants.  Oh, there were the occasional times when I was “floated” to different areas within the hospital where I struggled to be the med nurse on the surgical ward or the “active listener” in the Psych department. I never felt comfortable with adult patients. My heart, my mind, and my expertise were always with the babies.  In later years, hospitals quit floating nurses from specialty units out to general medical floors.  I guess they realized that after so long working with only infants, we were literally “winging it” with the adults, and it just wasn’t smart or safe.

Before I actually retired, many of my co-workers would tell me, “you’re gonna miss the babies!” I’m still waiting for that to happen.  What I do miss are my nursing colleagues, and members of the ancillary staff too. Nursing in a hospital is so very much a “team sport” and I truly enjoyed getting to know everyone that was part of our team.  I don’t miss getting up at 4:15 am, the 88 mile drive in to the hospital, the long 12++ hour days, or working nights, weekends, and holidays. I DO miss the paycheck. I do miss my friends. I do miss the rare afternoon at work where I wasn’t running my tail off and could actually sit down and just hold and rock one of my tiny patients.  On those days I remember thinking, “they actually pay me to do this”. Okay, so maybe I do miss those babies, a little🙂

My career spanned a period of time when LOTS of changes and discoveries were made in how we treated premature infants. Believe it or not, there was no oximetery back in the late 70’s and early 80’s.  We had to draw so many blood gasses to determine lung function and ventilator settings that every few days we’d need to transfuse the baby to replace what we’d taken. There were no surfactants and nobody used CPAP, either – at least at the beginning of my career. We had many ventilator dependent patients that were extremely difficult to wean off — and how many little ones ended up with severe vision problems because we couldn’t keep a super close eye on their oxygen saturation?  Seemed like we did lots more exchange transfusions (for jaundice or high bilirubin problems), and we were taught to always be attuned to a baby who began to run a low-grade fever, or suddenly was cold and couldn’t seem to warm up. Yes, this was in the days prior to all pregnant moms being tested prenatally for Group B Strep – a killer bacteria that is extremely dangerous for newborns.   All this reminds me of one of the many significant events of my nursing life.

It was about 1980. Could have been ’79 but it doesn’t matter either way. It was a LONG time ago. I worked evening shift back then, 3 – 11 pm.  My own two boys were really little – just 2 & 3, so I stayed home with them till about 2:30 pm when it was time to leave for work. Then my parents would come stay until hubby got home about 5:30 in the evening.  I was happy to work just three days a week, and on those days, I literally felt like I “worked” from morning to night. I’d be busy all day, taking care of the toddlers, doing your normal household chores, and I usually tried to have something ready for the family dinner when I wasn’t there.  Some days I’d go to work and start my shift already feeling totally exhausted.  I enjoyed my co-workers so much, even back then.  One of the other nurses was very pregnant with her third child.  “Janie” worked nearly right up to her due date, and seemed so full of energy – more than I had, that’s for sure. She was so good with parents and doctors, and of course with the babies.  Back then, in our rather small-town hospital, we had a large traditional newborn nursery and a small (3-4 bed) Special Care Nursery. We switched off working in both areas.  I loved the experience of working with normal newborns.  There was no “rooming in” in those days, so we “newborn nurses” walked literally miles every shift, carrying each baby to mommy’s room several times in an 8 hour period, and then back to pick baby up for a return trip to the nursery. Most evenings were very busy, depending of course on what the census was.  In those days, mom’s with normal vaginal births normally stayed in the hospital for 3 nights.  C-section moms were most often hospitalized for 5 nights.

My work day always began in the locker room back then. It was there that we had to change from our “dirty street clothes” into hospital provided scrubs prior to our shift. Everyone was talking about how our co-worker Janie had had her baby the day before. We were tittering on about how it was a girl and how big she was – at that time, prenatal ultrasounds were pretty much unheard of. Let me amend that.  Nobody ever got an ultrasound back then. It just wasn’t done, so we were all excited to learn it was a girl.  Janie now had a boy and two girls. Of course we were just thrilled for her. That evening, during my shift, one of the other nurses noticed that Janie’s baby had a bit of a temperature elevation. Since we were pretty cautious about that, we called the pediatrician to let him know.  Yes, nearly ALL the Peds were men back then. In an abundance of caution, the doc, who knew all of us nurses well, decided to come in and have a look at Janie’s newborn daughter. He decided just to be safe, he’d draw a CBC & blood culture (nurses were never allowed to draw blood cultures back then – at least where I worked).  None of the results were back before it was time for the evening shift to head home.  The next day upon arriving at the hospital, there was an entirely different aura.  Janie’s baby had taken a turn for the worse and was now in our small Special Care Nursery, on a ventilator with IV antibiotics going. She almost had a gray cast to her skin, she looked so unwell. It was so sad and difficult to see a baby belonging to one of our own – so sick,  and Janie, clearly very frightened as well.  Baby’s diagnosis came early in the shift. Overwhelming Group B Strep Sepsis.

Honestly, there couldn’t have been a worse diagnosis.  The neonatologist had already put little “Anna” on IV antibiotics, but it seemed like they weren’t helping.  Janie pretty much didn’t leave the Special Care Nursery at all, understandably wanting to be at her baby’s side.  Family members were in and out constantly. Still, little Anna didn’t seem to be responding to treatment.  The next day, with baby Anna getting worse instead of better, our neonatologist decided (with parental permission) to try a treatment that is normally NOT associated with Group B Strep.  Within a few hours, we were set up and doing a Double Exchange Transfusion. This entails slowly and carefully removing a few milliliters of blood from the baby, and then replacing it with new donor blood. The process can take several hours.  It was clearly and admittedly a last ditch effort to rid this baby’s body of the streptococcal bacteria.   I wish I had a wonderful, miraculous ending I could share with you, but I don’t. Janie’s baby Anna died that day. We tried everything we could to save this infant, both conventional and unconventional treatments, but nothing was effective. Words can’t describe how sad we all felt for Janie and her family.  Several months later, Janie did return to work and continued to be a wonderful, well respected nurse.

Nowadays, in the USA, all pregnant women in the care of gynecologists get a test for GBS at about 37 weeks gestation.  If it’s positive, they are treated with IV antibiotics when labor begins. This is a highly effective treatment for the prevention of transmission from mother to baby. I only wish we would have had this insight back in 1980 when Janie was expecting Anna.   On a similar note, I have very recently read online that routine prenatal GBS testing is the standard not only here in the US, but also in France, Germany, Spain, and Canada.  It is NOT available through the National Health Service in the UK. Apparently the test costs 11 pounds, and the government is choosing not to provide this as part of routine prenatal care. They are also concerned about the cost of antibiotics, should a mom test positive.  Here’s an interesting article on the subject: http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/government-leave-700000-mothers-untested-6966169   I usually try to stay apolitical on my blog, but MAYBE the recent British exit from the EU will allow Great Britain to spend some “new found” revenue on their own citizens — it seems to me that GBS testing on all pregnant women would be an excellent and prudent use of tax money.

I have lots of memories about actual events that happened during my career as a neonatal nurse. I will never share real names to protect privacy.  Please be on the lookout for the next installment in “My Life as a Neonatal Nurse” in a few weeks!

The twins’ 4th birthday!

This past weekend, we made a trip across the state (literally) to spend some time with the precious grand twins. Hard to believe those two have turned FOUR already!  They are cute, smart, loving, lively, articulate, and oh-so-huggable! I think this is such a special age because they are still at the point where it’s really exciting for them to have grandparents come visit. Actually, I hope that never changes, but…. in all likelihood, it will.  So for now, I’m cherishing the fun times we have together.  This year was not a kids party, it was just all the grandparents getting together to wish the twins a happy day – and shower them with love, attention, and gifts, of course. Unfortunately, little Jake was running a fever that day and not feeling well at all.  He wasn’t as perky as usual, so if he looks a little tired, he was. I didn’t take many photos as I forgot my camera, and I’m not thrilled with the quality of pics that my phone takes.  Here are a few.

Happy BIrthday to Jake and Katelyn!!

Happy Birthday to Jake and Katelyn!!

 

Blow out those candles!

Blow out those candles!

 

"Is it your birthday today, Katie?"

“Is it your birthday today, Katie?”

 

Grammie Suz and Katelyn!

Grammie Suz and Katelyn!

 

We had a lovely visit with the twins, their parents, the other grandparents, as well as my brother, “Uncle Brian”.

On another note, our cat Jinx has been dealing with some health issues lately. He was recently diagnosed with IBD, “Inflammatory Bowel Disease”.  He was prescribed an antibiotic pill and a steroid liquid. First, let me say that I think he’s doing better.  We’ll know for sure next week when he goes in for a weight check – we hope he will have gained up from his meager 7 pounds.  Giving him the pill has been a total nightmare. We have tried nearly every method to get him to take the pills – from pill pockets, to hiding it in food, wrapping it in cheese, and just prying his mouth open and shoving it in.  Sometimes we are successful, but much of the time – not so much.  The liquid seems to go in easier and the steroid seems to have helped the inflammation in his gut.  One thing we are supposed to do is put him on a “hypoallergenic” diet. He will eat the special dry food, but NO WAY will he consume the prescription canned food. Today I got out my meat grinder attachment and ground him some cooked chicken thighs. He seems to really like it. I may be making more cat food in the future!

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I made enough to freeze six zip-lock bags for future use. I couldn’t believe how easy it was to grind the chicken… I’ve had this attachment for literally years, and this was the first time I tried it!  Here’s hoping our Mr Jinx is up a few ounces – or even a pound – on his next vet visit.  :)

* For all of you cat food purists out there – this ground chicken is just a supplement to his regular food. I realize it is NOT a complete food, with all nutrients necessary for cat health.  Someday I may buy the powdered nutrients that one adds to meat, to make homemade food into a complete cat food.